What do marketing technologists want? This recruiter found out…

Erica Seidel, who runs The Connective Good, specializing in recruiting leaders in marketing analytics and marketing technology — and who has also graciously served on the advisory board for the MarTech conference and will be a moderator at our big event in San Francisco next month — has said that the right marketing technologist can be the secret weapon for a CMO looking to drive top-line and bottom-line growth.

But marketing technologists don’t grow on trees (yet) — and there’s a lot of competition for recruiting this new breed of talent. How can organizations attract good marketing technologists and keep them?

Erica went straight to the source and posed two questions to a number of leading marketing technologists:

  1. Thinking ahead to your next career opportunity, what would represent career growth to you?
  2. What is the single most compelling thing — aside from money — that would entice you to explore a new role?

The following slide deck includes the answers from 17 of them across the industry:

Don’t miss the opportunity to meet Erica and hundreds of marketing technologists at MarTech next month. There are still a few tickets available, but they’re going fast.



  1. Robert Johnson says:

    This is a fascinating survey and for me on the edge of Martec inspirational. My only criticism is that slide decks are horrible on my iPhone. Hello Martech here?

  2. We all want bigger budgets…but who can actually achieve a lot (ROI) with tiny or non-existing ones+ That is the true genius wanted…creative,analytical,go getter

  3. Kari- Doing a lot with a little $ shows true genius, and this can be a great way for a marketing technologist to prove his/her worth. You can get lucky and find a diamond in the rough for cheap with little experience who blows you away.

    If you’re looking to hire an already experienced marketing technologist who has proved his/her worth already, if you don’t plan on handing them a big budget to control, they’re probably not going to be interested– its like trying to hire an experienced graphic designer for cheap and saying “it will be good for your portfolio”; that works for people fresh out of design school, but once they’ve proved their worth its no longer attractive.

    Both options can be great choices depending on what your marketing department is looking for, but I feel this blog post is more aimed at the latter scenario.

  4. Thanks, all, for sharing your perspectives and reactions. On the budget topic, I am reminded of a point made this week at a marketing conference by a COO from a major tech company. He has the good fortune of a sizable budget. He tells his team, “Money is not your problem. Your problem is figuring out how to deliver on the customer promise.” I liked that, since it’s another way of raising the bar for creativity in vision and execution.

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